11/13/2012 3:25 PM
Coaches: In your opinion, is ATH as important to zone defense. In real life I would guess that it is slightly less important in zone than in man. Do you think this holds true in HD?

Thanks,

AP
11/13/2012 4:44 PM
I value ath over speed for a zone
11/15/2012 12:19 AM
With a zone, i value ath over speed. Or, more specifically, more in comparison to speed than i would in other defenses. Mainly, you dont want to fall into the trap of thinking you can shirk def ratings in the zone.
11/15/2012 12:21 AM
Posted by artie40 on 11/15/2012 12:19:00 AM (view original):
With a zone, i value ath over speed. Or, more specifically, more in comparison to speed than i would in other defenses. Mainly, you dont want to fall into the trap of thinking you can shirk def ratings in the zone.
this is very true.
11/15/2012 7:54 AM
http://www.whatifsports.com/hd/TeamProfile/Ratings.aspx?tid=3908

My offense might not be very good, but here is a zone defense that seems to be doing well.
11/15/2012 1:18 PM
x
11/15/2012 8:40 PM
I run zone on two of my teams.  Both teams held opponents to under 40% from the field. I think a big factor in the success of zone teams is identifying when to play 2-3 and when to play 3-2. 

#17 Virginia Union

#23 Elizabethtown

11/15/2012 8:53 PM
Double teams too.
11/16/2012 11:49 AM
I think both speed and ATH are important, really depends on how you want your zone to work. If you want a zone that can hold offenses to sub 40% shooting consistently, you need a team with a good amount of elite defenders... 80+ guys and ATH say 70 + guys. The thing I hate worst about zone is its lack of TO ability in WIS. In my opinion speed has more to do with getting steals... what I have seen could be just random statistics but I have had guys lead my team in steals with sub 40 defense and 90+ speed with maybe 40- 50 ATH. Not sure what level you're playing at but these ratings are in respect to D2. 

Bottom line ATH and SP and Def are important period... regardless of sets.  I think Zone just allows you a little more flexibility than the other sets as far as still being successful with one or two bad defenders.
11/16/2012 3:29 PM (edited)
This may be true that the zone can "hide" a bad defender, but there is a flip side to this as well. There is no such thing as a shut down defender in the zone like there is in man. Which can be a bit frustrating too, from the zone defense coach point of view.

The defense will not be as good with that bad defender in the lineup as it would with another good defender. If you want to win by having a strong defense you don't want a poor defender out there no matter what defense you run.
11/16/2012 10:22 PM
Posted by milwood on 11/16/2012 3:29:00 PM (view original):
This may be true that the zone can "hide" a bad defender, but there is a flip side to this as well. There is no such thing as a shut down defender in the zone like there is in man. Which can be a bit frustrating too, from the zone defense coach point of view.

The defense will not be as good with that bad defender in the lineup as it would with another good defender. If you want to win by having a strong defense you don't want a poor defender out there no matter what defense you run.
I agree. I have also found that zones mix more effectively to deal with other teams shooting tendencies than other defenses. I will mix and match defensive and offensive lineups with the zone to match up against opponents to some degree of success. For example, in a 3-2 or 2-3, you can lock down on teams inside or outside strength by choosing the position of the wing defenders, and can customize your wing defenders. I will often put together a 3-2 with athletic SG and SF to start one game and a 2-3 with athletic 3 and 4 to rebound better the next. Last season, a coach in Rupp ran the 2-3 at a +2 through the tournament and made the Final Four. I haven't taken this approach before. I adjust for most games, but I thought that it was a cool approach to consider.

 
11/17/2012 9:57 AM
Sometimes in three two you put an extra guard defender at the three and in a two three you put an extra power forward in the lineup ...
11/17/2012 2:23 PM
Posted by milwood on 11/16/2012 3:29:00 PM (view original):
This may be true that the zone can "hide" a bad defender, but there is a flip side to this as well. There is no such thing as a shut down defender in the zone like there is in man. Which can be a bit frustrating too, from the zone defense coach point of view.

The defense will not be as good with that bad defender in the lineup as it would with another good defender. If you want to win by having a strong defense you don't want a poor defender out there no matter what defense you run.
I agree with this as well, but you have to remember that everyone is not going to be a great defender. You need offense as well. And there are lots of players that are generated who are superstar offensive studs but average/mediocre defenders. These players thrive in a zone because they can be hidden just as long as there arent many of them. There may not be a shutdown defender in a zone but you have the option to doubleteam if necessary. Also if great defender ratings get averaged with a poorer rating... that poorer defender actually becomes a better defender than he would be in a MTM because of the average. No one wins with defense alone, you must have guys that can score as well. 
11/17/2012 4:47 PM
And the good defender becomes a little worse when averaged with the weaker defender. Damn law of averages.
11/19/2012 2:04 PM
good thing the game isn't all about Def.
of 2

Terms of Use Customer Support Privacy Statement

Popular on WhatIfSports site: Baseball Simulation | College Basketball Game | College Football Game | Online Baseball Game | Hockey Simulation | NFL Picks | College Football Picks | Sports Games

© 1999-2014 WhatIfSports.com, Inc. All rights reserved. WhatIfSports is a trademark of WhatIfSports.com, Inc. SimLeague, SimMatchup and iSimNow are trademarks or registered trademarks of Electronic Arts, Inc. Used under license. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.