1/19/2013 8:30 PM
The baseball world lost two greats today. Earl Weaver and Stan the Man Musial.

Two of the best the game will ever know.  Weaver the best manager of the 70's and Musial possibly the best pure hitter of all time. And these guys won without cheating. And won the hearts of many a young kid.

1/19/2013 8:58 PM
I Agree, loved to watch Weaver coach and the way he used screw with Palmer was funny as sh_t.
1/19/2013 10:27 PM
I grew up in Rochester as a kid.  He managed the local farm team (Rochester Red Wings) before moving up to Baltimore.  Baltimore used to play the Red Wings in an exhibition every year.

Anyway, if you haven't heard Weaver's radio rants, you're missing out.  FYI,  DO NOT LISTEN IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO HERE SOME BAD LANGAUGE.  Weaver liked to use some salty langauge.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-6RYPRlqZk
 



1/20/2013 12:41 AM
Stan the Man was one of the most underrated hitters of all time....and a wonderful person.  RIP
1/22/2013 1:58 PM
Yup."Stan" was a Wonderful ballplayer.  But it was "The Man" who I give the most respect.
     Risking like sounding like my grandfather when I was a kid: "They don't make em like that anymore".

1/22/2013 2:25 PM
Stan the man...............The Greatest Cardinal of All.
1/24/2013 10:36 AM
Posted by jibe on 1/19/2013 8:30:00 PM (view original):
The baseball world lost two greats today. Earl Weaver and Stan the Man Musial.

Two of the best the game will ever know.  Weaver the best manager of the 70's and Musial possibly the best pure hitter of all time. And these guys won without cheating. And won the hearts of many a young kid.

Quick question on Musual:

Why didn't he enter into WW2 until 1945?  It seems strange that when JoeD, Williams, and countless others entered in 1942 - he played an additional 3 seasons.  Also, his stats during that period should be shaded - such as:

1943 MVP
15% of his hits came during 1942-44
12.5% of his RBIs came during 1942-44
45% of his triples came during 1942-44
Only 10.2% of strikouts (poor pitching in that era)

Ted Williams had better seasons then Musial both before and after WW2 and the lost 3 season (1942-45) during WW2 and the most of 2 more season (1952 & 1953) due to Korea.  I
1/24/2013 11:43 AM
Wow sjurat, way to spit on the dead mans grave.
1/24/2013 2:10 PM
Posted by polabonez on 1/24/2013 11:43:00 AM (view original):
Wow sjurat, way to spit on the dead mans grave.
No...however let's make sure we put things into perspective...
1/24/2013 2:31 PM
I don't think anyone ever said he was a better hitter than Williams
1/24/2013 2:40 PM
Posted by mikesy on 1/24/2013 2:31:00 PM (view original):
I don't think anyone ever said he was a better hitter than Williams
To quote Jibe's original comment..."Two of the best the game will ever know.  Weaver the best manager of the 70's and Musial possibly the best pure hitter of all time. "

Hence my umberage on the original thread.
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1/25/2013 11:54 AM
A couple of things on Stan:

He was not drafted until after the 1944 season. When drafted, he went. Was he a hero like Bob Feller, Ted Williams or Jimmy Stewart? No. Was he a draft dodger? No.

If you think Williams was a better hitter, fine. I won't argue. In fact, I agree that Williams was probably the best pure hitter of all time. But does Stan belong in the conversation? Yes. And if you remove 15% of his hits - he still had 3085!! He hit 475 HRs without juicing or cheating. Maybe he's the 8th or 10th best hitter of all time instead of the best. But he's not Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire or Rafael Palmeiro. No asterisk belongs next to Stan's numbers. He may not be the best hitter of all time, but I've read three ways to pitch Stan: 1) throw four wide ones and pick him off first; 2) be sure to back up third base after you throw your pitch; 3) throw the ball under home plate.

3630 hits, 475 HRs, and 1931 RBIs are among the least of Stan's accomplishments. He never got in trouble; he never even got thrown out of a game. Stan was married to the same woman for 70 years. He would sign autographs after a game as long as people wanted them. Stan never got mad at somebody who came up to him out of the blue and wanted an autograph. Stan was in a restaurant once and noticed a man with his family; that man's family was celebrating their young daughter's birthday. The father obviously recognized Stan but was embarrassed to approach him and did not want to bother Stan. So what did Stan do? He had the restaurant bring that man's daughter a cupcake with a birthday candle, went to their table and played Happy Birthday for her on the harmonica he always carried with him!

In the 1958 All Star game, there were seven African American players on the NL team. One was named Willie Mays. It was eleven years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier, but the black players found themselves in the back of the locker room playing poker with each other. Willie Mays described how none of the white players said "hi", or "welcome to the All Star game," or anything at all. Stan came back, greeted everyone, sat down, and played poker with them. And Stan didn't even know how to play poker.

I only saw Stan play at an old timer's game once in the 1970s. This is probably the worst Stan Musial story you will hear, but it's all I have. He batted twice. He was out the first time; when he walked to the plate the second time, he had this look on his face and carried himself like there were two outs in the ninth in a World Series game. Stan didn't whine or cry after an out, but he wanted a hit like his life depended on it. He lined out to right. The RF knew just where to play Stan I guess. But just once, I saw those lightning quick hands whip around and heard the crack of the bat.

If you read Joe Posnanski's article from a year or two ago about Stan, you will understand why he is "The Man."

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